Hot Sewing & Embroidery How-Tos

How To: Hem a sleeve

In this video, we learn how to hem a sleeve. First, turn your shirt inside out, then lay it flat. After this, grab the sleeve and fold it over to where you want it hemmed to. Next, place pins in the spots where you want your shirt hemmed, then go over the area with an iron. Next, go to your sewing machine and slip the sleeve around the platform arm. You will have to take the outer base off the machine to do this. Now, lower your needle and sew in the spots where the pins are, removing them as...

How To: Draft a Basic Bodice Pattern

Unlock the secret to clothing design. If you can draft and sew a basic bodice you can design virtually any kind of t-shirt, blouse or other top! Attach a skirt and you now have a dress! Take your measurements by using the guide in the " How to Take Your Measurements" section and let´s get started! If you would rather just whip up an easier beginners t-shirt go to How to Design a Quick T-Shirt.

How To: Take Your Measurements

These measurments should be taken and recorded before drawing up you clothing design pattern. Wear the bra and panties you will be wearing with the final garment. Another option, especially if you are going to be selling a series of the garments, is to follow a size chart. While sizing is not very standardized in the clothing industry, I like the charts on the Burdastyle website which are in both inches and centimeters. When measuring, the tape measure should be neither too tight nor too loos...

How To: Make a Military Bugle Cord Decorative Knot

Bugle cords are used as elaborate ornamental leashes on bugles and trumpets, but they are also used as snazzy ornamentation, called aiguillettes (a type of fourragère), on uniforms worn by certain members of the military. While you could buy one pre-made, you could also make one yourself. But this should not be confused with the infantry blue cord of the U.S. Army, which is another type of fourragère only with more elaborate knotting.

How To: Wrap embroidery thread around a bobbin

In this how-to video, you will learn how to wrap embroidery thread around a bobbin. In this example, the embroidery thread is both purple and light purple, but you can choose whatever you want. First, take the end of the embroidery thread and place it through one of the slots. Hold it back, and then wrap the embroidery thread around the bobbin until you get near the end of the thread. The end should be placed in a different slot on the bobbin. By viewing this video, you will learn how to quic...

How To: Tie a Kinky Lover's knot

To make a Kinky Lover's knot, first hang or keep the tag on something. Then take the first end. Tie it by keeping a loop. Then take the second end and pass it through the loop by leaving a loop. Then take the second end, which was taken earlier , through the loop made by the first end. Then pass the second end through the loop, which was made by the second end. The knot is ready! All we have to do now is to tighten the knot by pulling the two ends. Make it beautiful by arranging the tag clearly.

How To: Use buttonhole scissors

Couture designer Kenneth D. King is an expert in what you would need to fill up your sewing box. Here, he discusses buttonhole scissors. Buttonhole scissors are made for making buttonholes without stretching or damaging the fabric. By watching this video you can learn how to adjust your buttonhole scissors so that you can make different size holes. Make sure to never to use these scissors to cut through paper as it will make the scissors dull and make it a lot harder to cut through fabric.

How To: Recycle an old t-shirt into a no-sew head scarf

In this tutorial, we learn how to recycle an old t-shirt into a no-sew head scarf. First, lay your shirt out flat on a table and download the paper pattern from the video. From here, measure sixteen inches from side to side on the t-shirt that you are using. After this, follow the paper pattern on the shirt and cut out the pattern with scissors. Once you have finished this, use a fabric bonding agent to make the edges less frayed and fold them into each other. This is great for the environmen...

How To: Make a hair bonnet or night cap

Nightcaps are something that will never get old and have been around for years and years. Originally, nightcaps were invented around the Middle Ages and were used as a way to help prevent head lice. As the years passed by they became more useful in other ways, especially when it came to keeping ones head warm. For women, they were also used to keep not only their head warm, but also to protect the hair from any kind of damage. This video tutorial will show you ladies how to make a hair bonnet...

How To: Make a homemade hoodie out of an old t-shirt

This video tutorial in Arts & Crafts category will show you how to make a homemade hoodie out of an old t-shirt. Katia is presenting this video. First you cut out a T-shirt shape out of an old newspaper. You can do it freehand also. For the front piece, take the neckline down a little bit. Then draw a hood shape. To draw the neckline of the hood watch the video. So, you now have the back, front and the hood pattern pieces. Now take your t-shirt and cut it open from the side. Place the back an...

How To: Tie a single-strand Ringbolt hitch knot

In this video, JD, from Tying It All Together, demonstrates how to tie a knot known as a "Ringbolt Hitch". This is also known as "coxcombing". This type of knot was once a common tie used by sailors to dress-up items and parts of their ships. When tying a wheel, a "Turk's Head" knot was used to cover the part of the wheel where the two ends of the ring bolt met, which would firm up the hitch, and help to keep the tied ends from unraveling. It is a nautical tradition to use this type of knot t...

How To: Tie the decorative Pipa Knot

In this Tying It All Together video tutorial, you will learn how to tie a decorative pipa knot. To begin, take a piece of rope and fold so that you have two strands. Create a loop and take the left strand and loop it around the original loop. Continue doing this until you have layers of loop-like structures, gradually getting smaller and folding into one another. The effect is a woven-like structure. To actually secure the knot, fold the end strand into the last loop and then pull this end st...

How To: Tie the Basket Weave decorative knot

In this tutorial, we learn how to tie the Basket Weave decorative knot. First, hook your string to a hook, then tie a loop that is wide. After this, bring the strings to the top and make a heart shape. Now, twist the two loops on the side and twist them around each other. Now, bring the right string through the right loop and up through the left. Do this for the left string except using the opposite loops. When you are finished, pull on this tightly and release the string from the hook. Make ...

How To: Tie a Maedate knot

In this video, we learn how to tie a maedate knot. Start off by making a loop in the middle of the string followed by another loop placed next to it. Now, wrap these together in the middle and pull them out on the side. You will now have a shape that looks like a bow. Pull on both sides of the bow, where there will be two loops. You can pull on each of the loops if you want to back them larger. When you pull on the bottom strings, the loops will become smaller. After you do this, you will be ...

How To: Tie the decorative Panel Knot

The Panel Knot can be used for a number of different occasions. These knots are a great decoration piece and can be done with different styles and colors of rope to get a splash of life in your home. These knots can also be used as an accessory to any outfit. All you need is a piece of sturdy rope, your hand, and about 3 minutes to learn this great trade. This can also be a great activity for your family to enjoy making together.

How To: Conquer inset corners

Seamlines that incorporate sharp inside corners are cropping up in more and more patterns these days, including most designs with gussets, all shawl collars and some full-roll collars. Shirley Smith demonstrates her technique for creating a crisp, 90-degree corner, but it works for any angle. The only out-of-the-ordinary supply you'll need is a scrap of Swiss cotton organdy. So click the Real Player or Quicktime link and get started on learning how to conquer inset corners! Conquer inset corn...

Prev Page